Conservation

Our Mission: The Greensboro Science Center's conservation mission is to preserve species and habitats through on-site programs, community awareness, field studies and fundraising for local and global conservation efforts.

Our Vision: Conservation and preservation of animals and habitats can only be realized by altering individual habits and behaviors, and by working collaboratively with organizations, academics and governing bodies to better our environment.

Conservation Events

The GSC hosts events throughout the year for the Conservation Fund, which is used to support internal and field conservation efforts.

Pajama Jam
Brews & Bubbles
Tuxedo Trot

Coins for Conservation

Your small change is making a big difference!

Every time you visit the GSC, you are supporting wildlife conservation. Twenty-five cents of each admission ticket is allocated to conservation efforts. Upon entry, you will receive a token that allows you to cast a vote for 1 of 3 conservation projects. See below for current projects.

Oceana

Oceana

Established in 2001, Oceana is the largest international advocacy organization focused solely on ocean conservation. Oceana seeks to find practical solutions to restore our world’s oceans. While not focused on one species the organization influences decisions to address many ocean issues, from over-fishing, to shark finning.

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Save the Golden Lion Tamarin

Save the Golden Lion Tamarin

Golden Lion Tamarins are beautiful, little monkeys threatened with habitat destruction. They are only found in the lowland Atlantic coastal forest of Rio De Janerio, Brazil. There is a lot of urban expansion taking place around Rio De Janerio which as reduced available tamarin habitat to 2% of its original area. The land that does remain is in fragments and the monkeys are unable to move from one fragmented area to another. In addition, each area is too small to sustain healthy tamarin populations, so Save the Golden Lion Tamarin is working to create connectors among the fragments which permit the tamarins to move from one fragment to another. These forested connectors will allow the monkeys to move among the fragments and ultimately sustain the species.

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The Orianna Society

The Orianne Society

The Orianne Society is dedicated to conserving reptiles, amphibians and the ecosystems they inhabit. A hotbed for reptiles and amphibians are the longleaf pine forests like those in North Carolina. These delicate forests require fire to sustain healthy plant and animal populations. The unique soil balance and vegetation found in longleaf pine forests supports many animal species including the Orianne Society’s focal species the Indigo snake, Spotted turtle and the Gopher tortoise. Through surveys, monitoring programs, restoration efforts, educational and outreach programs the society works to protect and preserve the species of the longleaf pine forest.

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Conservation in Action

The GSC protects native wildlife by providing habitats for species in need. All activity from these projects is documented and shared with global conservation organizations to better preserve our backyard wildlife.

Eastern Bluebirds

Eastern Bluebirds

Honey Bees

Honey Bees

Brown-Headed Nuthatches

Brown-Headed Nuthatches

Candid Critters

Candid Critters

Box Turtle Connection

Box Turtle Connection

Butterflies

Monarch Butterflies

Conservation & Research Partners

Piedmont Land Conservancy

Piedmont Land Conservancy

The GSC supports the Piedmont Land Conservancy. Property throughout the Piedmont is protected and preserved in its natural state because of the work of the Conservancy. To learn more about Piedmont Land Conservancy and how to get involved, visit https://www.piedmontland.org/.


Mona Iguana

Mona Iguana Conservation

Invasive species are problematic around the world, but their effects are magnified on islands. Nearly half of our world’s threatened vertebrates live on islands and are endangered by invasive species. Mona Island, located off the coast of Puerto Rico, is home to the endemic and endangered Mona Rhinoceros iguana. From pine trees dropping needles that prohibit iguanas from building their nests, to feral pigs destroying the nests and habitat, to feral cats predating on the juveniles, this species is in need of protection. The GSC is helping Island Conservation, the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (DNER) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service save the species. Volunteers from Center for Conservation and Coastal Ecological Restoration: Vida Marina with Island Conservation staff have removed large amounts of pine needles from nesting habitats to allow the iguanas the opportunity to breed. The GSC has provided motion detecting field cameras for the island to monitor how the iguanas are using their restored habitats. The GSC research department and Island Conservation staff will work together to analyze the cameras’ content. To learn more about the project visit https://www.islandconservation.org/mona-island-puerto-rico/.


Freshwater Mussel

Freshwater Mussel Work

North Carolina is home to more than 60 species of freshwater mussels, and half of these are listed as endangered, threatened or of special concern within the state (source: http://ncwildlife.org/Learning/Species/Mollusks). These animals are an important indicator of water quality. Conservation partners throughout the state are working to protect and restore aquatic habitats and mussel populations in our waterways. The GSC houses the Eastern Creekshell mussel. This species is an ambassador for the many others in need of conservation, as mussels are the most imperiled group of animals in the world. In addition to the exhibit, GSC staff are working with the NCWRC to implement a field conservation project to help restore mussels. This project will invite local citizens to become more involved in their watersheds health.


Bat Echolocation and Bio-Acoustics Study

Bat Echolocation and Bio-Acoustics Study

Three bat detectors have been placed in the GSC’s zoo to investigate bat species presence and activity through the forest canopy year-round. The data are being collected as part of a long-term research study of bats in Greensboro and throughout North Carolina.


Seafood Watch

Seafood Watch® Program – A GSC Conservation Partner

The Greensboro Science Center is a proud partner of the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch® program to help consumers and businesses make ocean-friendly seafood choices.

Humans have depended on food from the oceans for thousands of years. But in recent decades, the health of the ocean has changed and the availability of healthy, sustainable fish is declining. Pollution, habitat destruction, and overfishing are placing our oceans’ fishes in trouble. But we can fix this and you can help.

What is Seafood Watch?
The vision of Seafood Watch is to help sustain wild, diverse and healthy ocean ecosystems that will exist long into the future. They encourage consumers and businesses to purchase seafood that is fished or farmed in ways that are sustainable. Seafood Watch uses science-based, peer reviewed methods to assess how fisheries and farmed seafood impact the environment and they provide recommendations indicating which items are ‘Best Choices,’ ‘Good Alternatives,’ and which ones to ‘Avoid.’

What You Can Do?
You can help keep the ocean healthy by picking up a Seafood Watch guide at the GSC and by following Seafood Watch on Facebook and Twitter. You can also download the free Seafood Watch app for up-to-date recommendations on where to find ocean-friendly seafood. With the Project FishMap app, users can share the location of restaurants and markets that carry sustainable seafood in our community.